Wigan and Tyldesley to get cash boost from £95m fund to revive high streets

Money will be spent on restoring vacant historic buildings in Wigan town centre
Money will be spent on restoring vacant historic buildings in Wigan town centre

Wigan town centre and Tyldesley are among 69 high streets across England set to benefit from a £95m fund to revive historic shopping areas.

Wigan will use up to £1.27m to restore vacant historic buildings to help support the creation of jobs and increase footfall in the area.

The funding was welcomed by Wigan Council, which described it as "fantastic news".

Leigh MP Jo Platt, whose constituency includes Tyldesley, said: "Huge congratulations to Tyldesley for securing this well deserved High Street renewal funding.

"Enormous pride in the local community there for stepping forward and submitting their bid to Historic England - I know how hard those who put the proposals together have worked on this.

"Now for the hard work turning this bid into a reality, but I will be supporting them every step of the way!"

Ministers said towns and cities from Plymouth to Middlesbrough will now be able to start spending the cash, which had previously been announced in May.

The Midlands will receive the largest slice of the funds - a total of £21.1m - while £18.7m will go to towns in the North West.

Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan said: "Our nation's heritage is one of our great calling cards to the world, attracting millions of visitors to beautiful historic buildings that sit at the heart of our communities.

"It is right that we ensure these buildings are preserved for future generations but it is important that we make them work for the modern world."

Funding for the projects had been earmarked earlier this year, with towns and cities invited to apply in May, and sees £40m from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and £52m from the Government's Future High Street Fund.

A further £3m will be provided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

The majority of the cash will be spent on essential repairs to historic buildings, developing educational projects to turn the sites into community hubs and helping increase skills shortages in areas like stonemasonry.

Communities Secretary of State Robert Jenrick said: "Today's funding, part of the £3.6 billion we have committed to helping towns across the country, will revitalise much-loved historic buildings, helping to reverse the decline of our town centres."