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Laurel and Hardy delight at autism film screening

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Film fans who have autism could enjoy the magic of the movies as a community arts group put on a special screening of classic comedy.

Leigh Film Society put on an afternoon of Laurel and Hardy films at the Pelican Centre in Tyldesley in association with local community interest company (CIC) True Colours.

One of True Colours CICs service users enjoying the Laurel and Hardy films

One of True Colours CICs service users enjoying the Laurel and Hardy films

The screening was designed to be autism friendly, both in the choice of films put on the screen and in the setting which was not overwhelming for the movie fans.

The event was part of Autism Awareness Week and the two groups will team up again to screen the iconic comedy duo at AutyFest at Pennington Flash later this year.

Leigh Film Society chair Paul Costello said: “The ethos of Leigh Film Society is to provide great film for everyone. We are fully inclusive of everyone in our community.

“We have worked in partnership with True Colours on a number of projects and it has always been rewarding for everyone. When they approached us to screen a film for Autism Awareness Week.we jumped at the chance.”

Cinema fans enjoying the riotous slapstick comedies

Cinema fans enjoying the riotous slapstick comedies

True Colours CIC director Marian Milling explained that people who have autism can experience many barriers and hurdles going to multiplexes

She said: “It’s often too much sensory overload for the people we support to go to a cinema with the surround sound systems used , the dark venue and air conditioning, as well as the limited film choices as most venues cater for children when providing autism friendly sessions.

“To have the opportunity to view films in a community setting such as the Pelican centre, where it’s lighter and more suitable in terms of acoustic sounds as well as having a choice of classics such as Laurel and Hardy, is fantastic.

“People with autism do enjoy being entertained and laughing together but can find modern comedies hard to understand with innuendo and subtle humour. Slapstick-based humour is easy to follow and understand in a world where social communication is difficult.”

To find out more visit www.truecolourscic.co.uk or www.leighfilmsociety.com