Atherton crime fighters

Atherton Community School forensic science project:  Mrs Peacock in the library with the school bell, or was it Colonel Mustard?...Pupils Callum Pedley and Emily Griffiths investigate as headteacher Elizabeth Haddock and head as Sixth Form Matt Bold act all suspicious and IT network manager Andrew Lawton plays dead
Atherton Community School forensic science project: Mrs Peacock in the library with the school bell, or was it Colonel Mustard?...Pupils Callum Pedley and Emily Griffiths investigate as headteacher Elizabeth Haddock and head as Sixth Form Matt Bold act all suspicious and IT network manager Andrew Lawton plays dead

CSI ATHERTON may not have quite the same high profile as Miami, but high school pupils certainly learned more about science by becoming crime-busters.

Pupils at Atherton Community School, the first free school in the borough currently based in temporary accommodation at the town hall, took part in a mock-up of a forensic investigation for an afternoon of interactive learning.

A victim, played by IT network manager Andrew Lawton, was discovered in the school library, with the rest of the school staff and pupils tasked with finding out how he came by his end and who was responsible.

Staff and pupils dressed up in the full-length white crime scene overalls to work in small groups through a forensic investigation, with other teachers taking the parts of various characters for the rookie detectives to interview and take fingerprints.

The young investigators’ efforts were not in vain, with one group successfully identifying the culprit and allowing an arrest to be made.

The school hopes the afternoon of thematic learning will help improve the pupils’ skills in maths, science, English and personal, social and health education (PSHE), as well as introducing variety into the school routine.

Principal Elizabeth Haddock said: “It was a brilliant event and the children had a whale of a time.

“It enabled them to work together in teams and draw conclusions from the evidence presented to them, improved their social skills and was also a really fun way to learn.

“We are looking at more project-based learning as it engages the children so much.”