Vengeful raid victim’s threat

Wigan and Leigh Magistrates' Court
Wigan and Leigh Magistrates' Court

A man threatened to destroy a pensioner’s house after believing a man who burgled him lived there.

John Daltrey visited a Wigan home last summer after being tipped off that the homeowner was the grandmother of a man who had stolen his bike.

He’s decided to take matters into his own hands

Ged Frazer

The 24-year-old of Lancaster Avenue, Tyldesley, approached Elizabeth Lyon’s house and asked if she was the man’s gran.

He then told her that her grandson owed him money and claimed that he had stolen his bike, then threatened to break her windows if she did not tell him his whereabouts.

Daltrey told her: “You’re an elderly lady, you don’t want your windows putting through, do you?”

He later said: “Next time I see him I’ll chop his ******* fingers off. I’ve just been inside, I’ll do time again for him.”

Daltrey had been jailed in 2014 for wounding and kidnapping.

Mrs Lyon said her windows were later smashed, although Daltrey has not been linked to the incident.

Wigan magistrates heard Daltrey took matters into his own hands after four separate calls to the police about the initial burglary went unheard.

He tried to back up his position with false claims of having CCTV footage that purported to show the man breaking into his house.

He later admitted no such evidence existed and that he had made up the claims in the hopes of pressuring the culprit into admitting to stealing the bike.

Defending, Ged Frazer said Daltrey’s actions were borne of frustration.

He said: “He was a victim of a burglary. His bike was stolen and so was some cash. He made four calls to the police and nobody even came to take a report. People talk about these crimes, he’s been given a name and he’s decided to take matters into his own hands.

“Frustrated by the crime, he has gone round to try to confront the man. He thought his visit to Elizabeth Lyon’s house would trigger recompense. It didn’t.”

Daltry was given a 12-month conditional discharge and was ordered to pay £200 in compensation.

The justices said: “Do not try to take the law into your own hands.”