Police want to trace irresponsible dog owner

The man wanted by police after his dog attacked a jogger and his dog in Abram
The man wanted by police after his dog attacked a jogger and his dog in Abram

POLICE have released an image of a dog owner and his pet after a jogger was attacked on a canalside path.

It happened at about 4pm on Monday 28 October 2013, when the runner, a 47 year-old man, was jogging down the canal tow path near Warrington Road, Abram, with his own pet black Cocker Spaniel.

As they passed a man and his brown Staffordshire Bull Terrier, which was not on a lead, this animal suddenly attacked the runner and his dog. The man was left with a nasty bite mark on his left leg and severe bruising.

The owner of the Staffordshire refused to give his details and walked off towards the Dover Lock Inn he then went out of sight and is believed to have either gone onto Warrintion Road towards Abram or down the path at the back of the pub towards Viridor Wood.

The owner of the offending dog is described as white, between 50 and 55-years-old, around 6ft 2in tall with a large build and aggressive manner. He had a greying shaven head, grey stubble, and was wearing a blue jacket/fleece, brown Puma trousers with white Puma logo on back of left leg, and grey trainers.

PC Gordon Beattie of Wigan East INPT said: “This innocent runner and his dog were set upon by an aggressive dog that had been let off its lead.

“As if that wasn’t bad enough, the owner didn’t apologise or hang around to check is he was OK or give his details. He is exactly the sort of irresponsible person who gives other dog owners a bad name.

“I now want people to take a look at the photograph we have released today to tell us if you recognise this man. He clearly couldn’t care less about his animal attacking random people and next time it could be a child or an elderly person that his dog sinks its teeth into.”

Anyone with information is asked to call police on 101 quoting incident reference 1698/281013 or Crime stoppers - www.crimestoppers-org.uk or 0800 555 111