Police warning for driver watching football at the wheel

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This is the moment a driver was caught watching the Champions League final at the wheel after swerving on the road.

Dash-cam footage taken by a car behind shows him blatantly watching the football match on his mobile phone.

The phone on the dashboard is clearly showing the football

The phone on the dashboard is clearly showing the football

A shocked couple slam the Ford Fiesta driver who is seen holding his phone against his steering wheel before moving off from a set of traffic lights.

A man in the car behind is heard saying: "He's watching the football on his phone!

"He's just had it it on his hand and he's put it on his dash thing - no wonder he was swerving all over the place."

The driver was given a warning letter by police after the couple handed the video over to Norfolk Constabulary.

The maximum sentence for anyone caught using a phone at the wheel of a vehicle is six penalty points and a fine of up to 1,000.

The maximum sentence for anyone caught using a phone at the wheel of a vehicle is six penalty points and a fine of up to 1,000.

The force released the footage, which appears to have been taken during the Juventus vs Real Madrid Champions League final on June 3, as part of a crackdown on drivers using mobile phones this week.

Officers have appealed for more drivers to hand in more dashcam footage of motorists being distracted by their phones at the wheel.

A spokesman for the force said officers were patrolling the roads with marked and unmarked cars and motorcycles fitted with dashboard cameras as part of Operation Ringtone.

"In addition to this, a new reporting form on the police website means members of the public can now submit dash cam footage to support the fight against those breaking the law," said the spokesman.

The maximum sentence for anyone caught using a phone at the wheel of a vehicle is six penalty points and a fine of up to £1,000.

Anyone convicted can also be banned from driving.

Chief Inspector Kris Barnard, head of the Norfolk and Suffolk Roads Policing and Firearms Operations Unit, said the public can play a key part in changing the mind-set of people and making this offence socially unacceptable.

He said: "We all witness it, momentary glances looking down at a phone or the more blatant offender seen holding and talking on their phone. The key thing to remember here is that while you're behind the wheel you are in charge of a machine, a machine which can seriously injure and even kill people if you're not in proper control.

"If you take your eyes off the road for just three seconds when doing 70mph you will travel further than the length of a football pitch. Ask yourself, what could happen in that time?

"We are doing everything within our power to stop offenders and hopefully prevent serious or fatal collisions. However, with the help of the public, submitting footage and supporting our investigations, we will be able to hold more lawbreakers to account."

Chief Inspector Barnard added: "Our aim is to make this offence as socially unacceptable as drink-driving. Drivers might not think a momentary glance at a text message is harming anyone, but think of what's going on around you.

"Hazards on the road, especially when driving at speed, can change so quickly and in that moment if you're not concentrating 100% you could easily cause a crash, injure or kill someone else, or become a casualty yourself. Is that text message, notification or selfie really worth it?"

Norfolk's PCC Lorne Green, said: "Under our #Impact umbrella we are keen to drive home the message to young people how irresponsible it is to use a mobile phone while driving. There are however no age barriers to such an offence with few people claiming never to have seen someone texting or talking while driving. A momentary lapse in concentration can lead to disastrous consequences and I fully support the call for members of the public to go that extra mile by submitting dash cam footage to our officers in a bid to catch those intent on breaking the law."