‘Leythers are living longer’

Professor Kate Ardern
Professor Kate Ardern

Women in Leigh are spending nearly a quarter of their lives with health problems that limit their day-to-day lives, new figures have shown.

It is a well known fact that women live longer then men, and new figures released by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) this week have reiterated that.

We know if people keep active, have regular check-ups, stop smoking, eat healthily, get involved in their communities and most importantly, take control of their own health, they can go on to lead healthier lives.

Professor Kate Ardern

But they also reveal how long men and women can expect to live healthy lives and that even though females might live longer they tend to spend more years with limited ability to carry out day-to-day activities.

Using data from the 2011 census, the ONS has calculated that in Wigan, women can expect to live to 80.8 years, but only to 61 without any limitations on their daily lives.

They will spend a larger proportion of their lives than men, 24.5 per cent, in fair or poor health, with 9.4 years spent with their day-to-day lives limited a small amount and 10.4 years with them limited a lot.

Men in the town can expect to live to the age of 77.3 on average but only to the age 60.2 able to carry out day-to-day activities without any limitation.

Of their final years, men tend to spend 8.2 of them only slightly limited and 8.9 of them facing big limitations on their day-to-day lives, meaning on average, are living more than a fifth of their lives of their lives, 22.1 per cent, in fair or poor health.

Professor Kate Ardern, director of public health, said: “We are 100 per cent committed to improve the public health of people in Wigan borough. Our health is improving year on year and the gap with other areas in England is reducing.

“Through The Deal for Health and Wellness and we are doing a huge amount of work to encourage people to lead healthier, more active lives.

“We know if people keep active, have regular check-ups, stop smoking, eat healthily, get involved in their communities and most importantly, take control of their own health, they can go on to lead healthier lives.

“We need people to take responsibility for their own health and take advantage of the great services and opportunities we have. Significant improvements have been achieved through a wide range of support and innovative programmes such as Lose Weight, Feel Great, NHS health checks and projects.”